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] let me ask you, would we have a holocaust with the fault -- really? i wonder. the aforementioned bob said this was in an interview with me a few years ago that in the academy there's a feeling of don't let's be too rude to stalin. he was a bad guy, yes, but the americans were bad guys too and so was the british empire. eric die the, and apologist for communism and stalin. bob, who told the truth about the soviet union won a degree from a university run by, a sadly corrupt president, i believe, who admired bob. that says something about academia and the world. did you see the poster the e.u.? showing all the symbols of europe? it showed a cross, star of david, crescent and so on, and a hammer and cycle. there was a bit -- there's an outcry from the lit wanians, and why aren't we in the west sympathetic enough to the sufferers, the persecutors under communism to subject ourselves? why leave it to these? but there it was. i'm fairly relaxed about the communism symbols. you see a guy with a cccp sweatshirt and his trinkets. i did a study of this, a simple magazine piece, and, you know, t
the problems here, the father of the -- [inaudible] then like bob lovett and david bruce, smart guys. you've got a problem. and he says, you know, and you to get rid of dulles, allen does. his brother, john foster dulles, sector essay, a little harder to fire him, but more importantly, ike said it takes a strange kind of genius to run an intelligence service. and he's right about that. and allen dulles did have a strange kind of genius. so ike was reluctant to get rid of them. so he did. i think he regretted. susan's dad told me after the u2 got shut down he went to his father on the plane, the paris summit about to collapse her some, and said to him, dad, you should have fired back i. and ike blew up and basically said i'm the president and you're not. but it was little defensive about it because, yeah, he probably should have. these things are always clear in retrospect than they are at the time. ike was a great manager but he was arguably a little slow to get rid of people. he had no problem with sacking generals in world war ii, but maybe a little slow in his own administration in his
the audience through this. we have bob walk the audience through and i would like to start with a provocative opening comment that you make. you set my reporting over three decades has convinced me that we all need to recover a sensibility of time and space that has been lost in the information age when the molders of public opinion - against the hours that will to let them talk about the distinguished your times columnist tom friedman is labeled a flout world. instead little interest to readers to recruit decidedly unfashionable figures who will push of a heart against the notion that geography and a longer matters. so i want to just ask you to start with the basics of geography and tell us why the matter so decisively in the world. this is a pablumized by tom friedman's work greatly is what we can do is all the things. what i'm doing is saying find that human agency, that's fighting against things but what i'm showing you in this book is the other side, i'm not disagreeing with what they said but should i take back to the formidable barriers which if you do not respect you can never overcom
president, and like bob lovett, david bruce, smart guys, warn him, you got a problem here, and he says, you know, and you ought to get rid of dallace. he's the brother of john foster, secretary of state, but more important, really, he says it takes a strange kind of genius to run and intelligence service, and he's right about that, and allen did have a strange genius so ike was reluctant to get rid of them, begs to question to replace with whom? he did. i think he regretted it. john eisenhower told me that after the u2 was shot down, he went to his father on the plane to the paris summit about to collapse, the paris summit, and said to him, dad, you should have fired that guy, and ike blew up and basically said i'm the president of the united states, but it was a little defensive about it because, you know, he probably should have gotten rid of dulles. they are clearer in retrospect than they are at the time. ike was a great manager, but he was arguably a little slow to get rid of people. i think not in world war ii, no problem with sacking generals in world war ii, but maybe a little slow
that they were going to firewall is off the ticket. it was run by bob hannigan the national chairman who ran the st. louis machine that got chairman rehab acted in 1940 and ed pauly. at holly was the kolshorn yet oil millionaire who said i went into politics when i realize it was cheaper to elect a new congressman to buy the old one. he leaders going to get indicted for good reason. >> host: his name is on the -- >> guest: the build alien -- the pavilion, exact way. they decided they would try to surround roosevelt with all the people who were hostile to wallace if wallace is on the ticket. in 1941 when henry luce made his famous speech wrote his editorial saying the 20th century's going to be the ends century and the united states is going to dominate the world economically and military old and culturally coming made a famous speech. the 20th century should not be the american century, should be the century the common man so what we need is the worldwide people's revolution in the tradition of the french, the american, the latin american and the russian revolution and called for ending impe
't clear minded enough or clear eyed enough about the russians. bob gates also, who had moved over to deputy national security advisers. that little group kind of delayed the process for six months because the people in state were ready to progress with what had been achieved at the end of the second reagan administration. but it really delayed things. the person who turned that around who also deserves a great deal of credit was jim baker. jim baker did a great job putting together kind of an interagency management, and different players, and spent a good deal of time, would arrive in moscow with an entourage, with the negotiators, jim woolsey from csc, the relative assistant secretary, broke them into working groups and continue the process raws participated in, there was a delay. i don't think there were any problems as a result. >> just wanted to say james baker was named secretary of state the day after george bush was selected. within a week he met with regional assistant secretaries to understand their priorities. my priorities were opportunities and challenges to include ea
been submitted to bob patrick and the veteran's history project at the library of congress. for years and years researchers can find the interviews and use the stories for the future projects. these men represent the less than 2 million world war ii veterans living today. men and women who fought across the world, to defend and protect not only our country from harm, but something much more fundamental. our freedom. freedom is the big ideal. it's used a lot used in washington, d.c. i sometimes wonder if it lost the potent sei. when joe was liberated. there was out pouk on the cot next to him. he died that soldier died the day after the liberation fobbing -- took place. the wall behind me reminds all that many paid the ultimate prize. those who made it home hugged their families, returned to work, and hardly ever talked about the war again. this me more yule allowed them to open and share the sometimes. sometimes for the first time ever. on the day he was liberated joe was asked about the experience and he said he learned two things. to pray at the nazi prison camp and every day is a b
republican senator bob corker discussed the january fiscal deadline at an event hosted by bloomberg government and deloitte consulting. see that at 8:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> we have had these explosions of knowledge in medicine, but we have not coordinated care and all the services end up having so many cracks at the cracks are as harmful as the diseases that we are treating. you've got to step back and ask, you know, are we hurting people overall? on a global level, what are we doing sometimes? of course now we've got the institute of medicine report pain 30% of everything we do may not be necessary and health care. when we step back from a 30% of all the medications are prescribed come to test the order come, the procedures, this is something i think, which is for the first time really being called out as a problem. >> defense secretary, leon panetta went to walter reed military medical center to celebrate the hospital's first anniversary and to pay tribute to medical professionals in the military. the hospital was created out of the merger of walter reed army medical center
can can. >> yes, bob british medical journal. most has been about the impact on the federal budget and balancing one pocket versus another. what analysis has been done on say on the exchanges on the complicate of the employability of seniors if an employer has to carry these additional costs for an extended period of time? my high hypothesis would be may would make them less employable in some ways, either that or hasten the flight away from employers even providing insurance. on the consumer side how would these increase cost effect access to care and probably qlt of care? >> paul, you want to start? >> sure. on your first question, i have actually not heard anyone or any of the studies suggest extending medicare eligibility age might hasten the point where employers might not have coverage at all. what i was trying to add earlier a majority outside of the industries where retire -- the effect of the age would be that at the margin there will be some employees that would continue in the work force longer because the subsidize they were seeing from the employer for health insurance
minded enough, clear-eyed enough about the russian. bob gates also, who moved over to national security. that little group kind of delayed the process i would say for about six months. the people let state i think were ready to kind of progress, you know, with what had been achieved toward the end of the second reagan administration. but it just really delayed things, because the person who turned that around, and he also deserves a great deal of credit, was jim baker. jim baker did a great job putting together kind of an inter-agency management for this process and the different players and he spent a good deal of time, i would say a year and a half or two years, arrived in moscow with an entourage with the negotiators from cfd of the relevant assistant secretaries. broke them into working groups and i think that process that ros participated in with schivinovski and gorbachev but there was a delay and i don't think it set us back. i don't think there were any problems as a result of that. >> thank you. >> i was just going to say that james baker was named secretary of state the day af
up to the mid 30s. ronald reagan brought it up to the mid 30s. bob dole in the midst of the anti-immigrant sentiment of the 1990s took it back below 30. george w. bush got it back up to the magic 40% that karl rove thought was the jumping-off point for neutralizing all these questions. so, you know, how -- we're talking about a fairly small margin of voters here. so if you, you know, a 10% shift in latino votes, moving a million two, million three, you know, the actual -- what the turnout is we don't really know yet. it's going the take a while. the exit poll numbers are losing credibility as time goes on, but that's -- i don't want to get too -- >> john king. >> geeky with you. yeah. [laughter] but the shift of a million voters, million and a half voters and romney would have been in the mid 30s in terms of his share. and everybody would have said that was a pretty good night for a republican. now, what would have happened in terms of actual states, i knew you were going to ask -- [laughter] >> and then i want to go down the row to get everyone. >> it's interesting, because it d
of the senate foreign relations committee for her work, senator bob menendez on the foreign relations committee. all those were very instrumental in dealing with this. senator durbin who has been a real champion on human rights. i want to acknowledge kyle parker, a staff person from the helsinki commission who was very instrumental in the development of this legislation, and i want to also acknowledge senator lieberman's work. i know he will be speaking in a few minutes. it was senator lieberman and senator mccain and myself that first suggested that we should pass the magnitsky bill, it's the right thing to do, but we certainly shouldn't let pntr go without attaching the magnitsky bill. i want to thank senator lieberman and thank senator mccain for raising that connection. it was the right thing to do. first of all, it allowed us to get this human rights tool enacted. secondly, i think it gave us the best chance to get the pntr bill done in the right form. so i want to thank both of them for their leadership on that. in 1974, we passed the jackson vanik law. it dealt with the failure of the so
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12